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  1. Health & medicines in New Zealand>
    Your health >
    Asthma

    Health & medicines in New Zealand
    How medicines are funded
    Medicines information
    Your health AsthmaAsthma medicines

    Diabetes
    Gout
    Influenza
    Heart disease
    Smoking cessation

    Hospital pharmaceuticals and the HML
    PHARMAC and hospital medical devices



    Asthma


    Asthma is common throughout New Zealand and can affect anyone at any age.




    Asthma is a condition that affects the airways in the lungs. The airways become narrower than normal. This makes it harder for you to get air in and out of the lungs, and causes wheezing (noisy breathing).

    Asthma is common throughout New Zealand and can affect anyone at any age. People can grow out of asthma, but it can also reoccur. Remember that people in New Zealand continue to die from asthma every year.

    Learning what to do, when to do it and who to call if your asthma gets worse will give you the confidence to help you and your family manage asthma better.

    The key to controlling your asthmaAsthma is a common chronic disorder of the airways that is complex and characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (bronchospasm), and an underlying inflammation. is knowing what to do, when to do it and who to call. There are six main steps:
    •Get to know your symptoms.
    •Avoid your asthma triggers i.e. things that cause your asthma to flare up.
    •Use a peak flow meter.
    •Learn how asthma medicines work.
    •Take a preventer every day.
    •Use a self-management plan.

    Symptoms
    •Coughing (indicates the airways are irritable).
    •Tight feeling in chest
    •Tiredness and crankiness are both caused by the asthma waking you up
    •Breathlessness or wheezing (playing sport, exercising, hurrying or just doing everyday things)

    You don't have to have all these symptoms – you may just have one. If you have anyone of these, your asthma may not be as good as it could be.

    Triggers

    A trigger is something that makes your asthma worse. Try to find out what your triggers are and try to avoid them, or take extra treatment before you come into contact with them.

    Several things can trigger asthma:
    •Allergies – pollen, animals, mould and fungal spores.
    •Exercise – but physical activity also helps people with asthma, so don't avoid exercise.
    •Weather – including changes of season and changes of temperature.
    •Infections – such as cold and flu viruses, and throat and nose infections.
    •Dust mites – found anywhere but especially in soft furniture, carpets, mattresses and bedding.
    •StressStress is a biological term which refers to the consequences of the failure of a human or animal to respond appropriately to emotional or physical threats to the organism, whether actual or imagined.Stress and worry.
    •Women's health – related to menstrual periods and pregnancy.
    •Smoking.
    •Work conditions – such as fumes, chemicals and sprays.

    Peak flow meter

    You can get a peak flow meter free from your health providers. If you are well, the airways are open and your peak flow will be close to your best. If the airways are tight (when asthma is playing up), your peak flow will fall.

    Last updated: 18 March 2013

    Related info



    Helpful websites

    Asthma Foundation of New Zealand






    Staying Asthma Free – All you need to know about preventers (3 pages, 10.5 MB) Best Practice Journal - Childhoood Asthma (Special Edition) (28 pages, 4.1 MB)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Health & medicines in New Zealand>
    Your health >
    Asthma

    Health & medicines in New Zealand
    How medicines are funded
    Medicines information
    Your health AsthmaAsthma medicines

    Diabetes
    Gout
    Influenza
    Heart disease
    Smoking cessation

    Hospital pharmaceuticals and the HML
    PHARMAC and hospital medical devices



    Asthma


    Asthma is common throughout New Zealand and can affect anyone at any age.




    Asthma is a condition that affects the airways in the lungs. The airways become narrower than normal. This makes it harder for you to get air in and out of the lungs, and causes wheezing (noisy breathing).

    Asthma is common throughout New Zealand and can affect anyone at any age. People can grow out of asthma, but it can also reoccur. Remember that people in New Zealand continue to die from asthma every year.

    Learning what to do, when to do it and who to call if your asthma gets worse will give you the confidence to help you and your family manage asthma better.

    The key to controlling your asthmaAsthma is a common chronic disorder of the airways that is complex and characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (bronchospasm), and an underlying inflammation. is knowing what to do, when to do it and who to call. There are six main steps:
    •Get to know your symptoms.
    •Avoid your asthma triggers i.e. things that cause your asthma to flare up.
    •Use a peak flow meter.
    •Learn how asthma medicines work.
    •Take a preventer every day.
    •Use a self-management plan.

    Symptoms
    •Coughing (indicates the airways are irritable).
    •Tight feeling in chest
    •Tiredness and crankiness are both caused by the asthma waking you up
    •Breathlessness or wheezing (playing sport, exercising, hurrying or just doing everyday things)

    You don't have to have all these symptoms – you may just have one. If you have anyone of these, your asthma may not be as good as it could be.

    Triggers

    A trigger is something that makes your asthma worse. Try to find out what your triggers are and try to avoid them, or take extra treatment before you come into contact with them.

    Several things can trigger asthma:
    •Allergies – pollen, animals, mould and fungal spores.
    •Exercise – but physical activity also helps people with asthma, so don't avoid exercise.
    •Weather – including changes of season and changes of temperature.
    •Infections – such as cold and flu viruses, and throat and nose infections.
    •Dust mites – found anywhere but especially in soft furniture, carpets, mattresses and bedding.
    •StressStress is a biological term which refers to the consequences of the failure of a human or animal to respond appropriately to emotional or physical threats to the organism, whether actual or imagined.Stress and worry.
    •Women's health – related to menstrual periods and pregnancy.
    •Smoking.
    •Work conditions – such as fumes, chemicals and sprays.

    Peak flow meter

    You can get a peak flow meter free from your health providers. If you are well, the airways are open and your peak flow will be close to your best. If the airways are tight (when asthma is playing up), your peak flow will fall.

    Last updated: 18 March 2013

    Related info



    Helpful websites

    Asthma Foundation of New Zealand






    Staying Asthma Free – All you need to know about preventers (3 pages, 10.5 MB) Best Practice Journal - Childhoood Asthma (Special Edition) (28 pages, 4.1 MB)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Health & medicines in New Zealand>
    Your health >
    Asthma

    Health & medicines in New Zealand
    How medicines are funded
    Medicines information
    Your health AsthmaAsthma medicines

    Diabetes
    Gout
    Influenza
    Heart disease
    Smoking cessation

    Hospital pharmaceuticals and the HML
    PHARMAC and hospital medical devices



    Asthma


    Asthma is common throughout New Zealand and can affect anyone at any age.




    Asthma is a condition that affects the airways in the lungs. The airways become narrower than normal. This makes it harder for you to get air in and out of the lungs, and causes wheezing (noisy breathing).

    Asthma is common throughout New Zealand and can affect anyone at any age. People can grow out of asthma, but it can also reoccur. Remember that people in New Zealand continue to die from asthma every year.

    Learning what to do, when to do it and who to call if your asthma gets worse will give you the confidence to help you and your family manage asthma better.

    The key to controlling your asthmaAsthma is a common chronic disorder of the airways that is complex and characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (bronchospasm), and an underlying inflammation. is knowing what to do, when to do it and who to call. There are six main steps:
    •Get to know your symptoms.
    •Avoid your asthma triggers i.e. things that cause your asthma to flare up.
    •Use a peak flow meter.
    •Learn how asthma medicines work.
    •Take a preventer every day.
    •Use a self-management plan.

    Symptoms
    •Coughing (indicates the airways are irritable).
    •Tight feeling in chest
    •Tiredness and crankiness are both caused by the asthma waking you up
    •Breathlessness or wheezing (playing sport, exercising, hurrying or just doing everyday things)

    You don't have to have all these symptoms – you may just have one. If you have anyone of these, your asthma may not be as good as it could be.

    Triggers

    A trigger is something that makes your asthma worse. Try to find out what your triggers are and try to avoid them, or take extra treatment before you come into contact with them.

    Several things can trigger asthma:
    •Allergies – pollen, animals, mould and fungal spores.
    •Exercise – but physical activity also helps people with asthma, so don't avoid exercise.
    •Weather – including changes of season and changes of temperature.
    •Infections – such as cold and flu viruses, and throat and nose infections.
    •Dust mites – found anywhere but especially in soft furniture, carpets, mattresses and bedding.
    •StressStress is a biological term which refers to the consequences of the failure of a human or animal to respond appropriately to emotional or physical threats to the organism, whether actual or imagined.Stress and worry.
    •Women's health – related to menstrual periods and pregnancy.
    •Smoking.
    •Work conditions – such as fumes, chemicals and sprays.

    Peak flow meter

    You can get a peak flow meter free from your health providers. If you are well, the airways are open and your peak flow will be close to your best. If the airways are tight (when asthma is playing up), your peak flow will fall.

    Last updated: 18 March 2013

    Related info



    Helpful websites

    Asthma Foundation of New Zealand






    Staying Asthma Free – All you need to know about preventers (3 pages, 10.5 MB) Best Practice Journal - Childhoood Asthma (Special Edition) (28 pages, 4.1 MB)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Health & medicines in New Zealand>
    Your health >
    Asthma

    Health & medicines in New Zealand
    How medicines are funded
    Medicines information
    Your health AsthmaAsthma medicines

    Diabetes
    Gout
    Influenza
    Heart disease
    Smoking cessation

    Hospital pharmaceuticals and the HML
    PHARMAC and hospital medical devices



    Asthma


    Asthma is common throughout New Zealand and can affect anyone at any age.




    Asthma is a condition that affects the airways in the lungs. The airways become narrower than normal. This makes it harder for you to get air in and out of the lungs, and causes wheezing (noisy breathing).

    Asthma is common throughout New Zealand and can affect anyone at any age. People can grow out of asthma, but it can also reoccur. Remember that people in New Zealand continue to die from asthma every year.

    Learning what to do, when to do it and who to call if your asthma gets worse will give you the confidence to help you and your family manage asthma better.

    The key to controlling your asthmaAsthma is a common chronic disorder of the airways that is complex and characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (bronchospasm), and an underlying inflammation. is knowing what to do, when to do it and who to call. There are six main steps:
    •Get to know your symptoms.
    •Avoid your asthma triggers i.e. things that cause your asthma to flare up.
    •Use a peak flow meter.
    •Learn how asthma medicines work.
    •Take a preventer every day.
    •Use a self-management plan.

    Symptoms
    •Coughing (indicates the airways are irritable).
    •Tight feeling in chest
    •Tiredness and crankiness are both caused by the asthma waking you up
    •Breathlessness or wheezing (playing sport, exercising, hurrying or just doing everyday things)

    You don't have to have all these symptoms – you may just have one. If you have anyone of these, your asthma may not be as good as it could be.

    Triggers

    A trigger is something that makes your asthma worse. Try to find out what your triggers are and try to avoid them, or take extra treatment before you come into contact with them.

    Several things can trigger asthma:
    •Allergies – pollen, animals, mould and fungal spores.
    •Exercise – but physical activity also helps people with asthma, so don't avoid exercise.
    •Weather – including changes of season and changes of temperature.
    •Infections – such as cold and flu viruses, and throat and nose infections.
    •Dust mites – found anywhere but especially in soft furniture, carpets, mattresses and bedding.
    •StressStress is a biological term which refers to the consequences of the failure of a human or animal to respond appropriately to emotional or physical threats to the organism, whether actual or imagined.Stress and worry.
    •Women's health – related to menstrual periods and pregnancy.
    •Smoking.
    •Work conditions – such as fumes, chemicals and sprays.

    Peak flow meter

    You can get a peak flow meter free from your health providers. If you are well, the airways are open and your peak flow will be close to your best. If the airways are tight (when asthma is playing up), your peak flow will fall.

    Last updated: 18 March 2013

    Related info



    Helpful websites

    Asthma Foundation of New Zealand






    Staying Asthma Free – All you need to know about preventers (3 pages, 10.5 MB) Best Practice Journal - Childhoood Asthma (Special Edition) (28 pages, 4.1 MB)

    ReplyDelete

  5. Five reasons you should be concerned about the economy
    September 4, 2013Business, Lifeedward, Edward Tj Gerety

    Edward Tj GeretyWe are at a strange, jittery moment for the U.S. economy. We’re all, essentially, like a car on a winding road about to turn a bend with no idea whether it’s a nice, smooth road ahead or a perilous mountain climb. Here are the reasons to think that it may be a rocky next few months.

    Syria could spiral in who knows what direction. The violence in Syria is escalating, and Western powers appear on the verge of air strikes. The turbulence has already driven oil prices up on global markets, and it is quite uncertain where things go from here. Almost no one is predicting a peaceful end to the civil war in the forseeable future; the best that people worrying about the U.S. economy can hope is that it remains contained to Syria and doesn’t spill out into something more disruptive across the Middle East.

    ReplyDelete

  6. Five reasons you should be concerned about the economy
    September 4, 2013Business, Lifeedward, Edward Tj Gerety

    Edward Tj GeretyWe are at a strange, jittery moment for the U.S. economy. We’re all, essentially, like a car on a winding road about to turn a bend with no idea whether it’s a nice, smooth road ahead or a perilous mountain climb. Here are the reasons to think that it may be a rocky next few months.

    Syria could spiral in who knows what direction. The violence in Syria is escalating, and Western powers appear on the verge of air strikes. The turbulence has already driven oil prices up on global markets, and it is quite uncertain where things go from here. Almost no one is predicting a peaceful end to the civil war in the forseeable future; the best that people worrying about the U.S. economy can hope is that it remains contained to Syria and doesn’t spill out into something more disruptive across the Middle East.

    ReplyDelete

  7. Five reasons you should be concerned about the economy
    September 4, 2013Business, Lifeedward, Edward Tj Gerety

    Edward Tj GeretyWe are at a strange, jittery moment for the U.S. economy. We’re all, essentially, like a car on a winding road about to turn a bend with no idea whether it’s a nice, smooth road ahead or a perilous mountain climb. Here are the reasons to think that it may be a rocky next few months.

    Syria could spiral in who knows what direction. The violence in Syria is escalating, and Western powers appear on the verge of air strikes. The turbulence has already driven oil prices up on global markets, and it is quite uncertain where things go from here. Almost no one is predicting a peaceful end to the civil war in the forseeable future; the best that people worrying about the U.S. economy can hope is that it remains contained to Syria and doesn’t spill out into something more disruptive across the Middle East.

    ReplyDelete
  8. 11 thoughts on “Five reasons you should be concerned about the economy”

    Pingback: Deficit grows as Econ shrinks | Edward Tj Gerety
    My Links
    September 4, 2013 at 16:20

    A better issue would be to look at the link: http://www.edwardtjgerety.com as that has the greater information in it.
    Reply
    My Links
    September 4, 2013 at 16:21

    Fukushima crisis

    How did we get to this point?

    updated 7:49 AM EDT, Wed September 4, 2013

    More than two years on from the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986, the situation at the crippled Fukushima plant remains toxic.

    Expert: Fukushima freeze plan not ideal

    updated 8:05 PM EDT, Tue September 3, 2013

    Nuclear expert Mycle Schneider says Japan’s $320 million plan to clean up the Fukushima nuclear site could be better.

    Why Fukushima is worse than you think

    It seems that we have been misled about the scale of the problem confronting Japan. The country needs international help — and quickly, says expert Mycle Schneider.

    Was Fukushima response too slow?

    updated 4:37 PM EDT, Tue September 3, 2013

    The Japanese government has finally stepped in to help clean up the toxic water leak at the Fukushima nuclear plant, as Paula Hancocks reports.

    How dangerous is nuclear leak?

    updated 6:49 AM EDT, Wed August 21, 2013

    Former nuclear power plant operator Michael Friedlander talks about the repercussions of the latest leak at Fukushima.

    What caused Fukushima disaster?

    updated 5:13 PM EDT, Thu July 5, 2012

    A Japanese Parliamentary report reveals the Fukushima nuclear disaster was a man-made crisis. Jim Clancy reports.

    Preventing another Fukushima

    updated 6:53 PM EDT, Thu July 5, 2012

    Physics professor Michio Kaku looks at how another disaster on the scale of Fukushima could be prevented.

    Fukushima two years later

    updated 5:23 AM EDT, Mon April 22, 2013

    Two years after an earthquake damaged the Fukushima nuclear power plant, fishermen say it’s still unsafe.

    Go ahead, order the sushi. Levels of radioactivity found in Pacific bluefin tuna spawned off Japan are far below anything that would pose a health risk.
    Reply
    My Links
    September 4, 2013 at 16:21

    Radiation reading spikes further near Fukushima water tanks – CNN.com

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    ReplyDelete

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